Acer C710-2833 11.6-Inch Chromebook – Iron Gray (16GB SSD)

Acer C710-2833 11.6-Inch Chromebook – Iron Gray (16GB SSD)

Acer C710-2833 Chrome book comes with these high level specs: Intel Celeron Processor 847, Google Chrome Operating System, 11.6″ HD Widescreen CineCrystal LED-backlit Display, Mobile Intel NM70 Express Chipset, Intel HD Graphics with 128MB of dedicated system memory, 2048MB DDR3 Memory, 16GB SSD Drive, 2-in-1 Digital Media Card Reader, 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi CERTIFIED, 10/100 Ethernet LAN, Built-In HD Webcam, 3 – USB 2.0 Ports, 1 – HDMI Port, 1 – Ethernet Port, 4-cell Li-ion Battery (2500 mAh), Up to 4-hours Battery Life, 3.05 lbs. | 1.38 kg (system unit only)Continually updated, always new, the Acer C7 Chromebook keeps getting better and better. It starts in seconds, has virus protection built in, and runs your favorite Google apps plus thousands more. At about an inch thin and 3 lbs. light, this Chromebook goes wherever you go and keeps your files safe and secure in the cloud.

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Key Features

  • 11.6″ HD Widescreen CineCrystal™ LED-backlit Display
  • Intel® Celeron® Processor 847(1.1GHz, 2MB L3 cache)
  • Google Chrome Operating System
  • 16GB SSD Drive
  • 2GB DDR3 Memory
  • Intel® HD Graphicswith 128MB of dedicated system memory
  • 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi CERTIFIED™
  • Built-in HD Webcam
  • Two built-in stereo speakers
  • 3- USB 2.0 Ports
  • 1- HDMI™ Port
  • Full-size Acer FineTip Keyboard
  • Multi-Gesture Touchpad
  • 4-cell Li-ion Battery
  • 3.05 lbs.| 1.38 kg(system unit only)

Learn More

Always New

 B00D6WF80G_image_A Start in seconds and have that new computer feeling — every time. Chromebook’s cloud-based Chrome OS and built-in virus protection refresh on reboot. No updates to track, no discs to insert, and backups are automatic, too. Unlike other computers, Chromebooks get better with age. Plus, Chrome OS’s intuitive interface makes it all so simple.

Always Apps

 B00BB9OXK2_image_B Chromebooks come with popular Google products built in. Play and work out of the box with Google’s Search, Gmail, Talk and YouTube™. Create documents, spreadsheets, presentations and drawings with apps like Google Docs, Zoho and SlideRocket. Get 100 GB of free storage on Google Drive for two years. Video chat with up to nine friends using Google+ Hangouts.

Always HD

 B00D6WF80G_image_C” border=”0” height= The Acer C7 Chromebook’s 11.6″ HD screen energizes your videos, pictures and web content. Crisp resolution brings family closer during video chats, and the HD webcam presents you at your best, too. Images are crystal clear on HD devices like monitors, projectors and TVs via the HMDI® port, and connect as you please with 3 USB ports plus VGA.

Always Simple

 B00D6WF80G_image_D” border=”0” height= Chromebooks require almost no setup, so you can go from unboxing to doing in minutes. Tasks are easy using the extra-large, button-free touchpad. Stay online with the Acer C7 Chromebook’s convenient and reliable wireless. With your Chromebook, you can even get online at 10,000 feet with 12 free in-air Internet passes.1

Work from your favorite coffee shop, browse the Web at the airport or wherever you are with up to 4 hours of cord-free battery life, you can get more done in your day.

1 Your Chromebook comes with 12 free Gogo® in-air Internet passes (estimated $150 value, redeemable for two years after Chromebook purchase) usable on continental U.S. flights of participating airlines.

Product Features

  • Intel Celeron 847 1.1 GHz (2 MB Cache)
  • 2 GB DDR3 RAM
  • 16 GB Solid-State Drive
  • 11.6-Inch Screen, Intel HD Graphics
  • Google Chrome, 4-hour battery life

3 thoughts on “Acer C710-2833 11.6-Inch Chromebook – Iron Gray (16GB SSD)

  1. Willy B.

    Cool Little laptop..But keyboard broke in a week! Fix Included here I bought this laptop for my Sister who is fairly computer illiterate, however I thought with a little time she would be able to figure it out. In addition, I wanted to check it out for myself being it is a new concept and being the nerdy IT guy in the family, I just had to fiddle with it. I like it! It does take some getting used to as others have mentioned (Touchpad is a learning curve, but nothing a usb mouse can’t fix if your struggling). The laptop basically is a tablet that is much easier and faster to navigate and use(If your used to a PC). I chose the solid state drive because I thought the less moving parts the better and quieter. I haven’t much time on it yet to give a really in depth review however I did come across a big problem with it after just one week that I wanted to share with everyone. The keyboard just stopped working out of the blue one day! Actually what occurred was the keys changed characters and you would get another letter when striking any key (ex. L would produce an R?)which unfortunately rendered the laptop completely useless. I could not troubleshoot it on my own even for a minute with this kind of problem. So I opted to reach out to Acer customer service via their on-line support chat. The support tech was nice however it seemed to me I just knew a little more about laptops than he did. Long story short, I had to put my 2 cents into the conversation in order for him to agree to offer something other than sending it back for repair. I was able to get them to provide a step by step re-load of the Chrome operating system which did fix the laptop! I have included those steps here in case anyone runs into a similar problem and does not want to send theirs back for repair. (See below:)Additionally I have found that the laptop consistently loses the wifi connection and I have to restablish a connection often. I have had some issues with my wireless routers recently as well so this may be a mute point but I thought it was worth mentioning. All in all I like it so far and even though we’ve had some breaks along the way, they were fixable ones. It is working fine now and I would still reccommend the laptop for web surfing, FB, music & video streaming etc.Here are the re-install steps from Acer support:** One caveat is that I believe these steps below are specific to the solid state drive version and not a SATA drive version so please beware of your version beforehand!The following steps outline how you reinstall Chrome OS by erasing the stateful partition:1. Turn off your Chromebook.2. Press and hold the esc key and refresh (F3) key and then press the power key to turn on the Chromebook.3. The Chromebook will boot to Developer Mode. Press the ctrl key and the d key to turn off OS verification.4. When prompted to turn OS verification off, press the enter key.5. The Chromebook restarts.6. At the OS verification is OFF screen, do not press the Spacebar. The recovery process will start automatically after approximately 15 seconds.7. The Chromebook begins erasing the stateful partition. This process takes about 5 minutes. A progress bar appears at the top of the screen.8. The Chromebook restarts and prompts to re-enable verification. Press the spacebar key.9. Press the enter key to confirm you wish to turn OS verification on.10. OS verification is back on and Chromebook reboots automatically.11. The “Welcome!” screen will be displayed and you can complete the OOBE.

  2. Jacob

    Perfect For A Secondary Computer The Acer Chromebook is great as an alternate computer. I’ve had it for about a week now and there have been zero issues. It runs fast, the keyboard is great, and the touchpad is nice. I use this mainly as a second machine. I have a desktop and this ifs great to use while on the go or if I don’t want to go and sit at my desk. Please be aware of what you are buying before you buy it is important. This is NOT a full blown computer. You cannot get Microsoft word on it or any other software outside of the google store.

  3. R. Tupelo Schneck
    R. Tupelo Schneck says:

    Delightful and versatile computer for a great price—this is the right Chromebook to buy Thank goodness—Amazon is finally offering the Acer C7 directly at the canonical $199 price! I’m moving my big Acer C7 review from its original home at .Executive summary: $199 is a great price. Chrome OS is quite an interesting and enjoyable computing environment which serves a wide range of needs (close to all of my family’s computer use for sure). The Acer C7’s performance is noticeably better than that of the $249 Samsung ARM Chromebook for certain things, notably 720p video and Flash games. Plus, the Acer can be opened up and upgraded, unlike the Samsung. Along with “cheaper” those are basically the only areas in which the Acer beats the Samsung, but those made my decision for me. The major flaws of the Acer C7 are the tiny hard-to-use cursor keys, and the downright horrible speakers; the major flaws of Chrome OS, for me, are local network file access and limited supported media formats. Those are significant problems, but for $199 they are not showstoppers.I’m quite fond of my Acer C7 Chromebook. The overwhelming feature is the price. $199!(If Amazon doesn’t keep the price at $199, check out Newegg and Best Buy instead.)Chrome OS offers a zero-maintenance solution to having a second computer around for family members who essentially only need a web browser anyway. I’ve come to really enjoy using it. I enjoy knowing that I will never need to provide much tech support for it.A potential buyer of the Acer C7 might also be considering the $249 Samsung ARM Chromebook. I think the Samsung Chromebook is substantially more beautiful, has no fan, and has a much better keyboard and speaker. However, it is underpowered. At Best Buy I was able to try them side by side. The Acer was able to handle 720p video from YouTube almost (though not quite) perfectly; on the Samsung dropped frames were much more noticeable. I also tried a Flash game, Bloons Tower Defense 5, which I’ve noticed is surprisingly stressful for my older laptops. It runs fine on the Acer C7, but is very choppy on the Samsung. Finally, it is easy (if potentially warranty-breaking) to expand the RAM on the Acer C7 up to 16GB (!), and even to replace the hard drive (probably not necessary for most users). The Samsung ARM Chromebook is essentially impossible to upgrade. That, for me, was the clincher.The Acer C7, though not actually ugly, is not a particularly pretty machine. The plastic around the display has a particularly cheap look-and-feel. The hinge at least feels strong. The display itself is reasonably nice, with a decent viewing angle. It’s glossy.I do not like the keyboard. I think overall it’s not a great keyboard (especially compared to the Samsung ARM Chromebook which has a lovely pleasant-to-use keyboard). The really awful thing is the cursor keys, which are startlingly small and also scrunched up with the page up and down keys. It is really, really unpleasant to use the cursor keys on this keyboard. There are other oddities, if not real problems. The Enter key is oddly shaped for no apparent reason other than gratuitous ugliness. The keyboard has a Fn key, the only purpose of which is to have a Wifi-Disable keypress Fn-F11 (did anyone really need that?) and to send function keys over Chrome Remote Desktop (I suppose someone might need that—but I regret having a whole key for it in prime territory). This keyboard puts extra Chrome OS Search keys down with the Control and Alt keys, which is unusual in Chrome OS devices, but it does work to my benefit as it sends Command to Macs over Chrome Remote Desktop. In case it helps anyone, right-Control also sends Command.I like the Chrome OS keys for back, forward, refresh, full screen, and next window.The touchpad is quite a bit more resistant to clicking than I would like. I use tap-to-click instead, but there’s no tap-only variant of click-and-drag. (I want the 3-finger drag from Apple.)I often use this Chromebook attached to an external display (and keyboard and mouse… think of it as a desktop replacement!). When I first posted this review I mentioned some issues with this configuration. A Chrome OS update in mid-February 2013 fully resolved these issues for me. The OS auto-update feature is delightful, by the way, automatic and non-intrusive.With an external Mac keyboard, Command sends Control, which is great for someone whose hands are used to Mac key shortcuts.The absolute worst thing about the Acer C7 is the speakers. They are bad. Really, really, bad. They’re quiet and tinny and I can hardly stand to listen to them. I’m no audiophile, either—I think almost anyone who uses this machine will cringe a little bit at the sound quality. Was this really necessary to hit this price point? Be prepared to use…

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